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Looking for an older USFA publication? You can find it in the USFA library. From the library’s online card catalog, enter your keywords and then check “USFA Publication” under “Limit by Collection.”

Electronic Cigarette Fires and Explosions in the United States (2009 - 2016)

Fires and explosions caused by e-cigarettes are not common, but their consequences can be devastating and life-altering for the victims. The main cause of the fires and explosions is failure of the lithium-ion batteries. Learn how e-cigarettes work, about recent fire and explosion incidents, and why the e-cigarette/lithium-ion battery combination presents a new and unique hazard to users.


NFIRS Data Snapshot: Halloween Fires (2014-2016)

This report shows for each year from 2014 to 2016, an estimated 10,100 fires were reported to fire departments in the United States over a three-day period around Halloween and caused an estimated 30 deaths, 125 injuries and $102 million in property loss.

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NFIRS Data Snapshot: Hospital Fires (2012-2014)

This report shows for each year from 2012 to 2014, an estimated 5,700 medical facility fires were reported to fire departments in the United States. Nearly a fifth of those (1,100 fires) were in hospitals. It is estimated that these fires caused fewer than five deaths, 25 injuries and $5 million in property loss per year.

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NFIRS Data Snapshot: Medical Facility Fires

This report shows for each year from 2014 to 2016, an estimated 5,800 medical facility fires were reported to fire departments in the United States. It is estimated that these fires caused five deaths, 150 injuries and $56 million in property loss per year.

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NFIRS Data Snapshot: Nursing Home Fires (2012-2014)

This report shows for each year from 2012 to 2014, an estimated 5,700 medical facility fires were reported to fire departments in the United States. Nearly half of those, 2,700 fires, were in nursing homes. It is estimated that these fires caused fewer than five deaths, 125 injuries and $13 million in property loss per year.

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NFIRS Data Snapshot: Thanksgiving Day Fires in Residential Buildings (2014-2016)

This report, based on 2014 to 2016 data from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS), examines the characteristics of Thanksgiving Day fires in residential buildings.


Portable Heating Fires in Residential Buildings (2013-2015)

As part of a series of topical reports that address fires in residential buildings, this report addresses the characteristics of portable heater fires in residential buildings, as reported to the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS). The focus is on fires reported from 2013 to 2015 — the most recent data available at the time of the analysis. NFIRS data is used for the analyses throughout this report. For a broader overview of heating fires, see the companion topical report, “Heating Fires in Residential Buildings (2013-2015),” Volume 18, Issue 7.

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Topical Fire Report Series: Clothes Dryer Fires in Residential Buildings (2008-2010)

This report examines the characteristics of clothes dryer fires in residential buildings.


Topical Fire Report Series: Attic Fires in Residential Buildings

This report examines the characteristics of the estimated 10,000 attic fires in residential buildings that occur annually in the United States, resulting in an estimated average of 30 deaths, 125 injuries, and $477 million in property damage.


Topical Fire Report Series: Civilian Fire Fatalities in Residential Buildings (2013-2015)

From 2013 to 2015, civilian fire fatalities in residential buildings accounted for 90 percent of all fire fatalities. This report focuses on the characteristics of civilian fire fatalities (e.g., gender, race and age of the victim; activity prior to death) in residential buildings as opposed to the characteristics of the fires (e.g., fire spread, factors contributing to ignition, alerting/suppression systems) from which these fatalities occurred.


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